20th Dec, 2020 Read time 6 minutes

Young Male Construction Workers and Suicide | Tap Into Safety

Here we share the article from Tap Into Safety which looks at construction workers and the worrying suicide rate


There is continued evidence of a significant link between construction workers and suicide that needs addressing. In Australia, the latest statistics show that every day eight people take their own lives and a further 30 attempt to commit suicide. In 2017, around 75% of people who died by suicide were males. It appears that when other demographics such as age, gender and industry are applied to the number of deaths by suicide and daily attempts to commit suicide, that young male construction workers are most at risk

In this article, we look at some recent research that investigates the literacy of young male construction workers and suicide prevention. The aim of the study is to determine the interventions that are most successful in improving suicide prevention literacy among young men. The study notes that young men have a higher propensity to regard the workplace as having a role in reducing suicide rates and addressing mental health. This finding suggests that there is an opportunity for workplace interventions, but the types of programmes you use are critical in improving mental health literacy and changing beliefs.

Why Are Young Construction Workers Most At Risk?

Many people working in construction are manual workers or tradespeople and some have limited education and low socioeconomic status. These two traits are known to be the highest risk factors for self-harm and suicide in young people, with large numbers working in construction.

Research suggests that those in the highest occupational skill level group have lower rates of suicide, while those with the lowest skill level such as labourers, cleaners, or plant operators have higher rates of suicide. Furthermore, those working in manual occupations are at higher risk of suicide than the rest of the working population. Many manual workers are young men. Finally, young men in the construction industry have higher suicide rates than older men.

The link between young male construction workers and suicide may be a result of poor mental health literacy. Critically, we rely on mental health literacy to recognise the early symptoms of decline in ourselves and in others.  Generally, males are less adept than females at correctly recognising symptoms of mental illness. However, a lack of mental health literacy may delay or block help-seeking behaviour.

While mental health literacy is crucial to seeking help for mental health concerns, many do not seek formal help. Interestingly, older male construction workers are less likely to feel that formal or informal support will make a difference and are less likely to seek help. However, young people are more willing to endorse more informal sources of help for mental illness.

What Did The Study Find?

The study finds that young men have poorer suicide prevention literacy than older age groups. But young men are more likely to endorse the role of the workplace in addressing the link between construction workers and suicide and their overall mental health.

Given these findings, the role of workplace training should not be underestimated, as it is clearly an avenue to increase mental health literacy. What is most interesting is that young construction workers are looking in their workplace for sources of informal help for mental illness. Therefore, workplaces that provide training and support may reduce the numbers of young construction workers who suicide or commit self-harm.

The research also notes the differences in suicide literacy between construction workgroups. Those in manual roles, for example, labourers, technicians, trades, machinery operators, and drivers show poor suicide literacy and lower endorsement of the role of the workplace in addressing mental health and suicide. Whereas, those in more managerial and office-based roles are more knowledgeable and more supportive of workplace interventions. These occupational differences highlight vulnerabilities among young manual workers, suggesting that they should be the focus for suicide prevention programmes and initiatives.

The study investigates the role of the workplace in addressing and supporting mental health. Those aged 15–34 years are more likely to expect the workplace having some responsibility in addressing mental health. Workers who are 35 years or older have a far lower expectation.

How Can We Increase Mental Health Literacy?

The expectation of young workers that the workplace has a role is noteworthy and suggests potential to strengthen mental health in this vulnerable group. It is known that young males are reluctant to seek help for mental health problems from professional sources. Their acknowledgment and expectation of the workplace as having a role in addressing mental health is crucial. It suggests that younger groups and specifically young male construction workers may be receptive to workplace mental health and suicide education and prevention programmes.

Given the link between young male construction workers and suicide, the challenge is how to deliver education programmes that appeal to this group. The study shows that they are willing to engage in informal supports in the workplace. Therefore, there is a place for interventions such as MATES in Construction who visit worksites for casual chats and advice. Additionally, there is an informal role that online training and apps can take, given they are usually private and self-serve.

To Conclude

The link between young male construction workers and suicide is very worrying mainly because this group is reluctant to seek formal help. However, this study shows that young people are more willing to endorse more informal sources of help for mental illness than older workers. Also, young workers expect the workplace to play a role in supporting mental health. Therefore, younger groups and specifically young male construction workers may be receptive to workplace mental health and suicide education and prevention programmes.

Given these findings, the role of workplace training should not be underestimated, as it is clearly an avenue to increase mental health literacy. Workplaces that provide training and support may start to reduce the numbers of young construction workers who suicide or commit self-harm. It’s time to step up!

 

HSE Network
Article by: HSE Network

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